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I am going to finish an apprenticeship with a master chef, so I have to write my CV.
I sat for a public examination in 6 subjects, 3 credits and 3 passess, two years ago.
In the first row of my CV, I want to list the results of these six subjects, but my teacher advised me not to do it this way.
She told me to make it clear and neat for people to read.
Let's assume that this is the CV, and in the first row, I have written this record:

Public examination: 2012, 6 subjects, all passess.

But as soon as I have done this, I found that people may get confused with the word, pass, and thinking if it is a verb instead of a noun.

Are there any replacements for the word, pass, in my question?

Thank you

Kitty

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    Make it a verb: You have passed examinations in six subject areas. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 15 '15 at 16:46
  • Thank you TRomano, do you mean I shall write it like this: Public examination: 2012, 6 subjects, all passed ? – kitty Sep 15 '15 at 16:48
  • Sounds fine. Is it common? Have you seen it in other CVs? – Victor Bazarov Sep 15 '15 at 16:57
  • I won't comment on the layout and format, since that is beyond the scope of the site, but it is clear from what you have written that you passed exams in six subjects in 2012. (As you have it in your comment, "passed" is the past-particle used as an adjective. But that's fine, grammatically.) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 15 '15 at 17:06
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    If you do use the word "passes" in any form, note that it has only one terminal s. (passes, not passess) – Adam Sep 15 '15 at 17:26
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When referring to exam results, it's fine to use 'pass' as a noun.

"My sister got distinctions for her ballet exams but all I got were passes."

Your sentence makes sense to me. It sounds like a credit might be better than a pass though, in which case you could say,

Public examination: 2012, 6 subjects, three credits, three passes.

2

Sure, a pass is understood to mean a passing grade in this context. However, shouldn't it be passes and not passess with two S's?

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