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In the following sentences:

This is a highly popular style among beginners. The case in point here is the practice of indenting continuation lines at the same level of the first argument in a function call.

Is the use of "case in point" correct? The definitions and examples I've found seem to use this expression only to introduce actual cases or examples, and not an explanation.

Should I change the sentence to something like the following?

The technique discussed here is the practice of indenting continuation lines at the same level of the first argument in a function call.

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    It would help us out a lot if you would include the full context. We can't tell you what it is unless we can get a good concept of what the "highly popular practice" is. – Catija Sep 17 '15 at 3:39
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A "case in point" is an example--it is a case (instance, occurrence, example) in defense of your argument--the "point" you are trying to make.

Edit: Without the actual context, I misinterpreted your sentences. You are citing "indenting at the same level" as an example of the highly popular beginner style--right? I would say the "classic example" or the "most common example": "The classic example here is the practice of..."

The "case in point" expression wouldn't typically be used in this structure. Here's how I'd phrase it if I were asked to use "case in point"--

"As a case in point, consider how frequently beginners indent continuation lines at the same level..."

| improve this answer | |
  • I must start using "shifazzy" in everyday conversation. – wfaulk Sep 17 '15 at 5:02

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