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What is the verb to request and get an ATM card from a bank in US Eng. ?

Such as I request, apply, or fill the form? Then the bank give, issue, or make an ATM card to me? Thank you very much!

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It would help if you gave a specific example with underscores in place of the words that you would like help filling in. But, using the second and third questions as a template, I would phrase it this way:

To receive an ATM card, I submit a request.

Or:

To get an ATM card, I request a new one.

For a real world example, you can look at word usage on Bank of America's request form.

Note: you receive the card in the mail, so you could also say that they will send you a new one.

Edit:
As an example, if a bank's customer spoke to a teller at the branch or a representative over the phone, the request can be phrased this way:

I lost my debit card and would like to order a replacement.

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    Thank you all very much! The situation is that I lost my ATM card. As a redult, i have to make an additional request for a new one, which is not in the standard process of obtaining a ATM card when opening a new bank account. I hope my explanation helps to verify the proper verbs. – Superuser Sep 18 '15 at 4:43
  • @Superuser Yes, that does help; thank you for providing the context. I'll edit my answer with an example of a bank's customer asking for a replacement debit card. – John B Sep 18 '15 at 5:05
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The words you have put in your questions are good ones. You're on the right track.

You apply for the ATM card. The application is a formal request to the bank. You fill out the form as part of the application process.

Assuming your application is approved, the back will issue you an ATM card, which is a fancy way of saying that they will make an ATM card for you and then give it to you (or, more likely, they will send it to you).

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  • I've never run into a bank that doesn't simply issue an ATM card... you don't have to "apply" for them the way you apply for a credit card. It would be the equivalent of a bank refusing to issue you checks. – Catija Sep 18 '15 at 0:32
  • @Cat - I agree with you, and I wondered if maybe the O.P. was confusing "credit card," and "ATM card" (which might be easily confused by a language learner). My answer focuses on the verbs that the O.P. suggested and asked about, not the the kind of card this applies to. But I'm glad you left your comment – it's an important part of the full story. – J.R. Sep 18 '15 at 0:54
  • Thanl you very much for your reply. What is O.P? Original Poster? – Superuser Sep 18 '15 at 17:23
  • @Superuser - Yes, the Stack Exchange often uses O.P. to mean "the person who originally posted this question." – J.R. Sep 18 '15 at 18:02

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