4

In the weekend

or

On the weekend

I know various books denote it "on the weekend", but I need to know why "in the weekend" cannot be used even if it shows duration.

  • The last sentence looks weird @nathan tuggy. Something is missing! – Rucheer M Sep 19 '15 at 6:12
  • @RuchirM: True enough, but that's the way it was written, and I didn't feel like my correction would improve the question without losing the writer's voice. (It's also not really wrong, just odd.) – Nathan Tuggy Sep 19 '15 at 6:21
  • Related (possibly a duplicate of): where do people say ON the weekend (geographically speaking)? – Damkerng T. Sep 19 '15 at 7:09
2

Unfortunately, there doesn't appear to be a great explanation for why. It is just an odd nuance of English that we do things on days and in months.

I'll be staying at school on the weekends.

and

I will return in the month of May.

The following two links give a few more examples.

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  • 1
    Note that "over the weekend" can show duration, e.g., "She will be traveling over the weekend." Also, and I won't go too far with this because I'm a U.S. English speaker, "at the weekend" seems more common in British English than in U.S. English. – vstrong Sep 19 '15 at 3:18
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    To quote the second link, "At the weekend is a British English expression, which is used the same way as on the weekend in American English. Speakers of American English may understand this expression, but they do not use it." – Luke Fritz Sep 19 '15 at 3:33
  • What's interesting is . . . I don't think I say "on the weekend" much. More "this weekend" or "last weekend" or "over the weekend." It's a good question! – vstrong Sep 19 '15 at 3:48
1

'In the weekend' is a common error.

A popular confusion is 'on the weekend' OR 'at the weekend'.

In that, it's the register that makes the difference. BrE and AmE

Learner's Dictionary quotes:

'At the weekend' is a British English expression, which is used the same way as 'on the weekend' in American English. Speakers of American English may understand this expression, but they do not use it.

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  • what do you mean by this line "the register that makes the difference. BrE and AmE"Can u explain with an example – justin takro Sep 19 '15 at 14:50

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