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Is it correct to say "from 1 to 6 December"? Or we need to use just "1 to 6 December"?

For example like in this sentence,

This subscription is available only from 1 to 6 December.

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    It would be better if you provide some examples showing how you're going to use it in your sentences. – Damkerng T. Sep 20 '15 at 11:12
  • @DamkerngT. I've added example – Alexander Myshov Sep 20 '15 at 11:14
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    "This subscription is only available from 1st - 6th December." A hyphen between times or dates tells us that something starts from one and lasts until the other. – Joe Dark Sep 20 '15 at 11:23
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    Time period expressions are also very variable between dialect variations of English. – Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩 Sep 20 '15 at 11:42
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    In the US it would be "...from June 10th to August 25th" – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 20 '15 at 12:45
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The two expressions have two different implications.

The subscription is available only from 1 to 6 December

This implies that there is an offer that one can only take advantage of during a certain period. That is, the subscription can only be bought from 1 December to 6 December.

The subscription is available only 1 to 6 December

This carries the implication, at least in my mind, of something that lasts only a few days.

If you want to make that implication clear, you can say that the subscription lasts from 1 December to 6 December.

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