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My own example:

"I take off my contact lenses and I always feel tingle."

Does the sentence I shortened equal the example below?

"Taking off my contact lenses, I always feel tingle."

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  • When taking out my contact lenses, I always feel a tingle. You take out a contact lens, not "off".
    – Joe Dark
    Commented Sep 22, 2015 at 20:23
  • "While" works just as well, but it's not "one action happens just before another", it's simultaneous. Commented Sep 22, 2015 at 20:35
  • They seem about the same to me, however, you should either say "feel a tingle," or "feel tingles."
    – J.R.
    Commented Sep 22, 2015 at 20:37

1 Answer 1

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No, it gets interpreted as "simultaneous action" rather than one that follows the other.

I think the problem is that "taking [out]" is a continuous action, not a complete one. You could say

Finishing taking out my contact lenses, I always feel ...

The use of the "finishing" gives the previous action (taking out of lenses) completeness, which helps in temporal and causal connection to the next action, feeling the tingle.

Or, simpler,

After taking out my contact lenses, I always feel ...

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