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Please see which of the following two clauses is correct/better?

1) The cow came out of the truck.
2) The cow came out from the truck.

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    Could someone transfer this to ELL, which would probably be closed for being a duplicate? – Blessed Geek Sep 22 '15 at 10:11
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    @BlessedGeek: since ELL site graduation, you can vote to close with "belongs on ELL" as a predefined reason :) – oerkelens Sep 22 '15 at 10:21
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    Both are correct, but "out of the truck" is easier to say and therefore more likely to be used. – kelario Sep 28 '15 at 0:38
  • Both convey the same meaning, but "out of" is normally used in America. "out from" is the preposition form that my native-German-speaking relatives usually use. – PaulProgrammer Sep 28 '15 at 21:49
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I'd go with number 1.

"From" is generally used with places larger than trucks. :-)

E.G. He came from Chicago.

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Both are grammatically correct as well as understandable. As an American I feel that out of <location> feels more natural.

However, you can use out from <preposition> <location>. For example:

Come out from under that rock!

The suspect came out from behind the tree with his hands held up.

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