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I read a sentence:

Air power is like poker. A second-best hand is like none at all — it will cost you dough and win you nothing.” — General George Kenney,Commander of Allied Air Forces in the Southwest Pacific, 1942-45.

In daily use, "dough" often refers to money. In this sentence, does it also mean "money"? Does "dough" always mean "money" in the expression "cost you dough"?

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    Yes, dough in this context would always mean money. The only real exception would be some sort of wordplay; a joke to a baker, perhaps. – Jason Patterson Sep 23 '15 at 2:20
  • @JasonPatterson I'll upvote that answer! – Damkerng T. Sep 23 '15 at 2:31
  • @DamkerngT. Thanks. I sometimes wind up on here when I don't have sufficient time to write what I feel would be a proper answer, but there are questions with straightforward answers that can be answered briefly in comments. Since the answers are sometimes needed quickly by the questioner, I leave a short (insufficient) answer as a comment and am always fine with another user providing a more thorough, similar answer in due time. That's what happened in this case, and I'm glad that Maulik V was able to provide a good answer with a link to a proper definition and such. – Jason Patterson Sep 24 '15 at 2:15
  • To be clear, I'm not saying that Maulik V copied my comment into an answer or anything inappropriate in any way, shape, or form, only that the content of my comment and his answer are similar. :-) – Jason Patterson Sep 24 '15 at 2:17
  • True! That's the reason the comment has many upvotes. I just made it as an answer because many 'skip' comments and thus, they miss the answer. Unfortunately, as a moderator I have 'turn answer into a comment' privilege but not the other way round! :) @JasonPatterson – Maulik V Sep 24 '15 at 5:07
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Yes, cost you 'dough' means cost you 'money'.

It's an old fashion slang for money

dough: [uncountable] (old-fashioned, slang) money

The author means that it'll cost money but in return, there's nothing.

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