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He has not married and will not marry in near future.

She is intelligent but her sister dull.

Both are compound sentences. But in both cases the usage of verb is different.
Why we have not used is in the second sentence after sister?

  • 2
    In American idiom we don't normally encounter that particular kind of ellipsis. We'd contract the verb, and say She's witty but her sister's dull. or She's smart but her mother's stupid. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 23 '15 at 17:25
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    You can use is in the second sentence, and you can use he in the first. Both of them have been deleted by a rule called Conjunction Reduction, which deletes repeated words from conjoined clauses in compound sentences. He is the subject of both clauses in the first sentence, so it's deleted in the second clause. In the second, the subjects are different, and so are the predicate adjectives, but they both have an auxiliary is, so it's deleted in the second clause.. – John Lawler Sep 23 '15 at 22:15
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As John Lawler commented, this is a case of conjunction-reduction and Gapping.

From thefreedictionary:

Conjunction-reduction -(Grammar) (transformational grammar) a rule that reduces coordinate sentences, applied, for example, to convert John lives in Ireland, and Brian lives in Ireland into John and Brian live in Ireland.

In your first sentence (He has not married and will not marry in near future), the subject is He, and it is omitted by the same rule.

Similarly,

John stole a bike and sold it immediately.

is the same as:

John stole a bike, and he sold it immediately.


Your second sentence is a case of Gapping

Again from the same dictionary:

Gapping - (Grammar) (in transformational grammar) a rule that deletes repetitions of a verb, as in the sentence Bill voted for Smith, Sam for McKay, and Dave for Harris

In the above example, the verb "voted" is deleted to avoid repetition:

Bill voted for Smith, Sam voted for McKay, and Dave voted for Harris.

From Wiki:

Gapping usually elides minimally a finite verb and further any non-finite verbs that are present. This material is "gapped" from the non-initial conjuncts of a coordinate structure. Gapping exists in many languages, but by no means in all of them, and gapping has been studied extensively and is therefore one of the more understood ellipsis mechanisms.Stripping is viewed as a particular manifestation of the gapping mechanism where just one remnant (instead of two or more) appears in the gapped/stripped conjunct.

Example:

  • Some ate bread, and others [ate] rice. <=> Some ate bread, and others rice.
  • Fred likes to pet the cat, and Sally [likes to pet] the dog. <=> Fred likes to pet the cat, and Sally the dog.
  • Jim has been being observed by me, and Tom [has been being observed] by you. <=> Jim has been being observed by me, and Tom by you.
  • Should I call you, or [should] you [call] me? <=> Should I call you, or you me?
  • Linda had a beer, and Irvin [had] a coffee. <=> Linda had a beer, and Irvin a coffee.

Coming to your sentence, now it would be easier for you to understand why we have not used is after sister.

She is intelligent but her sister dull. <=> She is intelligent, but her sister is dull.


Go through the links provided below for more clear understanding.

Conjunction reduction - a question on ELL

Fusion of clauses

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