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Does my usage of "draws on" and "direction" correct in this sentence?

We believe if a method draws on the user assistance, the direction must be toward tasks that are easy to accomplish for an average user but difficult for the machine. For example, distinguishing a semantic cue within a web page content is an easy task for a human user, but difficult for the machine and could be effective in the data extraction process.

I used the "direction" as the aim or intention of using the human knowledge in a method.

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    By draws on, do you mean requires? – Damkerng T. Sep 23 '15 at 19:12
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    Also "user assistance" (without article) or "the assistance of the user". – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 23 '15 at 21:25
  • I don't think this should be closed. From the last sentence it's clear to me how Ahmad wants to use direction. – ColleenV parted ways Sep 24 '15 at 14:06
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    If I understand you correctly, you want to say "User interaction should only be required for tasks that are easy for an average user and difficult for a computer." Direction isn't quite the right word there, but I can't think of another that would fit in it's place. We may need to rearrange the sentence a little to make it more clear how the "user assistance" is being used. – ColleenV parted ways Sep 24 '15 at 14:20
  • @ColleenV Yes I mean that, I gave an example how the user can assist the process. – Ahmad Sep 24 '15 at 16:33
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We believe if a method draws on the user's assistance, the direction must be toward tasks that are easy to accomplish for an average user but difficult for the machine.

The two bold phrases are not completely incorrect (except that you should make user possessive, or drop the definite article), but I think that they are really unusual ways to phrase your idea in this context and might cause readers to have to stop and re-read the sentence to understand.

When speaking about methods in a programming context, they need user interaction to function, not user assistance. Assistance isn't exactly wrong, but in general, the computer is assisting the user and not the other way around. For example, if a clerk is helping you deposit money into an account, informing the clerk of which account you would like the deposit to go into isn't assisting the clerk exactly - it is providing the necessary information for the clerk to assist you.

Likewise, a computer or method can not "draw on" people (unless this is the Matrix and people are being used to power it!). The method requires user interaction, or allows user interaction (if the interaction is optional).

So we have:

We believe if a method requires interaction from a user, (...) tasks that are easy to accomplish for an average user but difficult for the machine.

Now we must figure out how to connect one condition (requiring user interaction) to another condition (accomplishing certain sorts of tasks). Because we started with "if", a good choice might be "then".

We believe if a method requires interaction from a user, then the direction must be toward tasks that are easy to accomplish for an average user but difficult for the machine.

The direction of what? There isn't anything in the previous clause that might be moving in a direction. You might be able to say "...then it (the interaction) must be directed toward tasks...", but that is too verbose in my opinion.

These are some examples of ways I might phrase it:

We believe that methods should only require interaction from a user for tasks that are easy to accomplish for an average user but difficult for the machine.

or

We believe that methods should not require interaction from a user, unless it is to accomplish a task that is easy for an average user and difficult for the machine.

or

We believe if a method requires user interaction, then it must be to accomplish a task that is easy for an average user and difficult for the machine.

I will have to do some research to explain why I believe it is a good idea to connect your clauses with "if-then", "should-unless", or something similar when constructing a sentence like this one. Maybe someone more knowledgeable will be able to help explain it.

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