1

A committee has been appointed by the Prime Minister to examine the possibility of relocating troops in Jammu & Kashmir (J&K).

What exactly does the above statement mean?

  1. Does it mean that the govt. is thinking to move extra troops into J&K?

  2. Does it mean that the govt. wants to reshuffle troops already within J&K?

  3. Does it mean that the govt. wants to relocate troops from J&K to other states?


Side Question: As the name of the prime minister is not mentioned, shouldn't it be a treated as a common noun and use small letter case (prime minister) instead of Prime Minister?

2

Although you have asked about the use of the word in I also think your examples have made assumptions in meaning beyond what is written in the sentences. The sentences, as written, do not imply the Government wants or thinks in the way you implied! You might have further information that implies or indicates that meaning but it is not contained in the sentences. To be clearer, Governments sometimes appoint a committee when they wish to procrastinate, avoid or infinitely delay an action, which can mean the opposite of what you wrote.

However, sticking with what you wrote, meaning (1) would not be implied from the sentence and without further information meanings (2) and (3) could be equally implied. Relocating would always imply the quantity involved is unchanging, only their location changes, but the location could be changed to within or without the area.

The word Prime Minister should be written capitalised as it implies a specific Prime Minister and not a generic prime minister.

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0

#2 is correct. The word "in", indicates the troops already deployed in J&K. #1 would be correct if "into" was used instead of "in".

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