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When I googled it I saw that some people used this collocation but Google ngram couldn't find it. So I am confused if it is proper English to say :

Even though they use different formulas to calculate GDP, they get to almost the same conclusion.

After I scrutinized both paintings, I get to the conclusion that the left one was counterfeit.

  • books.google.com/ngrams/… – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 30 '15 at 13:44
  • I've concluded the painting is fake. -- Oh, and how did you get to that conclusion? The collocation is not normally used with "the" but with "that", when "conclusion" refers to forming an opinion rather than to the end of something like a story. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 30 '15 at 13:51
1

You usually use reach, come to, or arrive at a decision, agreement, or conclusion, but it's not proper to use "get to a decision, agreement, or conclusion", though you can use the verb get in the sense of reaching or arriving at a particular place.

So reach, arrive at, or come to a conclusion fits well in both sentences. Besides, the OP should use the past simple i.e. "reached/came to/arrived at a conclusion" in the main clause of the second sentence.

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Hard to say without knowing the source, but in AmE I would expect reach a conclusion:

Even though they use different formulas to calculate GDP, they almost reach the same conclusion.
After I scrutinized both paintings, I reached the conclusion that the left was counterfeit.

You could also use arrive at.

  • 3
    To come to a conclusion is also very common. – Jason Patterson Sep 30 '15 at 1:19
  • If you reference to the sentences on the question when you say " the source" , they are my sentences actually or if you reference to the sentences shown up after google search , I do not know either their sources. – Mrt Sep 30 '15 at 1:22
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    Or "arrive at almost the same conclusion". – StoneyB Sep 30 '15 at 1:49
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The first example sentence is acceptable, but not great. "Come to a conclusion" and "reach a conclusion" are idioms, whereas "get to a conclusion" is not. "Jump to a conclusion" is also an idiom, but it means that the process of reaching the conclusion was flawed. My (American) ear would expect:

Even though they use different formulas to calculate GDP, they come to almost the same conclusion.

The second example sentence is grammatically incorrect. The second half of the sentence should be in the past tense, not the present tense. As user3169 suggests, I would expect:

After I scrutinized both paintings, I reached the conclusion that the left one was counterfeit.

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"Get to a conclusion" is comprehensible but not idiomatic.

The basic reason is that "get to" constructions have two meanings:

  1. the meaning of arrive or come to a place.
  2. the meaning of arriving in time. In this usage, it can be a marker of tense as in for instance, "I am going to be 6 feet tall when I grow up"

So for instance,

Just wait 'til I get to the bottom of this.

= I will get to the bottom of this and then something will happen.

For a conclusion, "get to the conclusion" could mean either:

  1. I read from top to bottom of a one page paper. At the bottom, I "got to the conclusion" in one sense.
  2. the argument brings us / they to the conclusion. In other words, the argument or data succeed in producing the conclusion.

As such, it's much clearer to avoid this sort of construction with respect to conclusions.

Moreover, even when comprehensible, this sort of use of "got" is not academic (and as such doesn't agree with "conclusion").

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The most common English phrase with this meaning is "get to the point" which means that the speaker should hurry up and say specifically what they want without any further messing around.

In the context the OP refers to in their example, the speaker would use the phrase, "I came to the conclusion that..." rather than "I get to the conclusion that...".

Basically, in English, people come to a conclusion rather than get to a conclusion. It's just how it's normally said.

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