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While going through Apple's webpage, I found the following sentence:

Every iPhone we’ve made — and we mean every single one — was built on the same belief. That a phone should be more than a collection of features.

Now, my question is: What is the need to break this sentence?

To my mind, it is better to write this sentence in continuity:

Every iPhone we've made- and we mean every single one- was built on the same belief that a phone should be more than a collection of features.

Another sentence on the same webpage is:

It should have hardware and software that were designed to work with each other. And enhance each other.

Here also, IMO, we can make a continuous sentence. I want native speakers' opinion regarding this.

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    Now you know why sensible people hate apple! ;) – Joe Dark Sep 30 '15 at 7:02
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    I'd use a colon instead, personally. That said, the period certainly doesn't make me imagine that the writer is a non-native speaker. – snailboat Sep 30 '15 at 7:13
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    It is becoming more and more common to find in marketing copy sentences. That are really only clause. Or just phrases. Or Single words. Yes. It. Is. Marketing English is not actual English, but it does influence English toward eventually adopting its quirky usage. Think different. Enjoy awesome. Chill. – Brian Hitchcock Sep 30 '15 at 7:34
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    @BrianHitchcock I write taglines, punch-lines etc. and use the 'dots' frequently separating single words (Discover. Describe. Deploy). It's fine. But then, when it comes to 'body', I do follow what I know of actual English! So, here, I second Ruchir! – Maulik V Sep 30 '15 at 8:24
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    Breaking sentences like this is, as far as I can tell, very common in novels. So, it's unsurprising in creative writing. I think. – Damkerng T. Sep 30 '15 at 8:44
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Don't look for grammatical and syntactical precision in tag lines and other advertising copy. You have to see them more like a form of poetry (I'm not saying good poetry :-) ).

Taking it a little further though, I'd say that you have subtly modified the meaning of the tag line when you rewrote it as:

Every iPhone we've made - and we mean every single one - was built on the same belief that a phone should be more than a collection of features.

Having done that, notice that the word "same" is kinda redundant. You could just as easily have written:

Every iPhone we've made - and we mean every single one - was built on the belief that a phone should be more than a collection of features.

What this exposes is that Apple are actually making two slightly different points (which your version partly obscures):

  1. That there is a consistency of vision across their phone lines and
  2. They believe phones are more than collections of features

The fact that the consistency in point 1 just is what's mentioned in point 2 doesn't matter. As I say, they are using words poetically and that kind of repetition is perfectly valid.

If you wanted to rewrite and preserve that repitition, you'd have to have something like:

Every iPhone we've made - and we mean every single one - was built on the same belief; the belief that a phone should be more than a collection of features.

But that semicolon is clumsy, and overly busy in a headline such as we're dealing with. And (to naughtily begin my sentence with a conjunction) it just doesn't have the same impact on the reader. Apple's version, although strictly speaking grammatically incorrect, is simply better in this context.

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The full-stop after "belief" is plain wrong. "That a phone should be more than a collection of features" is not a proper sentence. You'd have to delete "That" to make it one. A comma would be OK, or a colon (which is short for "namely"), or even a semicolon, which these days seems to be used just to indicate a greater degree of punctuation than a comma.

My old English teacher drummed into us that no sentence should ever start with "And". It's a conjunction. "Also, " is usually a correct alternative. But in this case there is no subject for the verb "enhance" in the bit at the end, so it's not even a sentence. Instead try "... to work with each other, and to enhance each other."

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