3

The tap is leaking. The water is wasted.

____________________ resulting
___________________________.

Is this correct?

The leaking tap resulting the wastage of water.

  • The leaking tap is resulting in water wastage. – user30696 Feb 27 '16 at 13:59
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My best guess: The tap is leaking, resulting in water waste.

  • NOTE: I guess that it's tap (as in a water tap) rather than tape. The tape in your sentence could refer to some kind of seal tape, but if it really was seal tape, I'd expect the verb to be "torn off" or "broken", rather than "leaking".

The main point of your exercise seems to be about joining sentences by turning one of them into a participle clause. Because you're forced to use resulting, the exercise seems to want you to know the phrasal verb result in.

The main pattern of result in is result in something, which means that you have to turn the second sentence into a noun; which you did correctly as wastage of water, though I think waste is enough (wastage sounds a little too formal for me). You could use either a waste of water or simply use (like I choose to use) water waste.

We now have a good enough background to convert the two sentences. Let's do it!

Original: The tap is leaking. The water is wasted.

Use 'result in', turn the idea into a noun:
The tap is leaking. This results in water waste.

Join the two sentences by turning result in into resulting in (a participle):
The tap is leaking, resulting in water waste.


NOTE: The leaking tap resulting (the) wastage of water is not a sentence, even with resulting in:

Incorrect: The leaking tap resulting in wastage of water. <-- DON'T USE IT!

Why? Because the auxiliary verb is missing! If you want to phrase it that way, you need at least this:

The leaking tap is resulting in wastage of water.

  • "The tap is leaking, resulting in water waste." Is comma necessary to make the sentence considered grammatically correct? I don't seem to remember comma exists in the question... – XPMai Oct 2 '15 at 12:27
  • And "water wastage" correct too? – XPMai Oct 2 '15 at 12:37
  • a) "Is comma necessary to make the sentence considered grammatically correct?" -- Yes, you need a comma if you choose to join the sentence using the participle construction. (So, whether this construction is what your exercise and your teacher want or not would depend on the purpose of the exercise. In general, the more advanced the exercise is, the more possible alternatives we'll have, and the more advanced constructions we may use.); b) "And "water wastage" correct too?" -- Yes, you can use "water wastage" too. – Damkerng T. Oct 2 '15 at 13:07
  • It's national exam question. :P And is water being wasted allowed too? – XPMai Oct 2 '15 at 13:48
  • Oh! Practicing mind reading in addition to English would be a good idea, then. :D -- Yes, "resulting in water being wasted" is possible too. – Damkerng T. Oct 2 '15 at 14:01

protected by Community Feb 27 '16 at 14:25

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