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I am struggling with the following sentence: "The following result is the chain rule, and is the first of two results we prove."

It sounds fine to me, and better than "The following result is the chain rule, and IT is the first..."

Question: Should I add the it? Can I keep it hidden? Is this ever permissible?

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I think the "it" is unneeded, but why can't you just say "The following result is the chain rule, and the first of two results we prove"? I hope I understood your sentence correctly...

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  • That is actually a better alternative, thanks. In any case, are you sure in such sentences "it" can be dropped? – Fernando Sep 30 '15 at 15:00
  • If it doesn't create ambiguity, there shouldn't be a problem with it. In this case, the subject of your sentence is "result", and it has two predicates: "is the chain rule", and "is the first of two results we prove". – Ilanysong Oct 1 '15 at 11:51

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