1

When must we use the preposition in when we used the word interested.

Normal Usage:

I am interested in 18th century paintings.

How about these examples:

If you're interested don't hesitate to send me message.

or

a dialogue I saw in the Simpsons

Ned Flanders: Well looks like someone's having a pre-rapture party.

Homer Simpson: No, Flanders. It's a meeting of gay witches for abortion, you wouldn't be interested.

If I added in in the examples, what would they imply ?

If you're interested in don't hesitate to send me message.

Its a meeting of gay witches for abortion, you wouldn't be interested in.

  • The key here is context. In general you don't repeat what has already been established as context, so if you've already said or written "I am interested in 18th century paintings" that sets the context for a later "If you're interested, don't hesitate ..." in which "in 18th century paintings" is implied, not explicitly stated. Also, it's "If you're interested" not "if you interested". – nigel222 Oct 1 '15 at 14:23
  • 1
    In your last example, it's either "be interested" [in something implied by the established context], or explicitly "interested in something". You can't use "interested in." (period). In general there's something wrong if a sentence ends in a preposition, although in colloquial speech there are exceptions. – nigel222 Oct 1 '15 at 14:34
4

To put it simply, to be interested in is usually followed by an object, whereas to be interested isn't.

I am interested in 18th century paintings.

In the above quote, to be interested in is used because it is directly followed by the object (18th century paintings).

However, in the below quote, no object is followed, which is why to be interested in is not used, but rather, simply to be interested. If you wanted to use to be interested in, you can simply add the object at the end of the statement, as can be seen in my addition (in bold text):

Homer Simpson: No, Flanders. It's a meeting of gay witches for abortion, you wouldn't be interested in it.

Similarly, in your other examples, simply add the object in order to make the sentences proper and complete. You can do so as follows (my additions can be seen in bold):

If you're interested in it don't hesitate to send me message.

Its a meeting of gay witches for abortion, you wouldn't be interested in it

However, the sentences would be perfectly fine without the use of to be interested in in this case. Usually, the less verbose form is seen and heard.

I hope this helped!

4

You add 'in' if you want to specify the object of interest. You leave it out if it's implied from context.

If you just say "I am interested", without context, it's impossible to tell what you're interested in. That's why you'd specify: "I am interested in 18th century paintings." or "I am interested in the outcome of the election.", etc.

However, if you're already talking about something, it will be implied as the object of your interest, and it would be redundant to specify. So, in your second example, Ned and Homer both know they're talking about a gathering of people, so Homer doesn't have to say "You wouldn't be interested in the meeting."

Simply adding 'in' without providing an object (as you do in your examples) is incorrect.

1

The in is just pointing to the object that you are interested with

I am interested in, object.

I'm not interested object, but I am interested in an object. for example

I am interested in 18th century paintings.

I am interested in sports.

So if you are talking about your interest you always use in and the object.

Now in your other context that is also correct because it's a response so you wouldn't have to specify what the subject (object) is. If I am making a statement then you wouldn't know the subject until I have made my statement. In a response to that statement I would already know the subject so you wouldn't have to specify. Therefore if you don't need to specify the subject you also would not need the pointer (in) to point to the subject.
for example,

"I am interested in 18th century paintings".

"If you are interested, don't hesitate to send me a message.

"I am interested in sports".

"If you are interested, you should watch ESPN".

1

I am interested or

I am interested in it

"I am interested in" has no object.

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