3

What is more common or more correct (or both of them equals)?

1) It's so much difficult to me to express myself

or

2) It's so much difficult for me to express myself

4

1) It's so much difficult to me to express myself

"It's so much difficult..."

You appear to be caught between two ideas. On one hand, you were trying to keep it simple but chose the wrong synonym (so much instead of very). On the other hand, you were on the right path, but forgot to insert the adverb more, meaning "to a great extent." So either/or of the following is a good start:

  • It's so much more difficult...
  • It's very difficult...

"...to me to express myself."

Again, you appear caught between two ideas. It could be that you simply selected the wrong preposition (to instead of for). Or maybe you forgot to use commas to set off a parenthetic element. The second half can be completed in either of these two ways:

  • ...difficult, to me, to express myself.
  • ...difficult for me to express myself.

That leaves us with four options to complete this sentence:

  1. It's so much more difficult, to me, to express myself.
  2. It's so much more difficult for me to express myself.
  3. It's very difficult, to me, to express myself.
  4. It's very difficult for me to express myself.
  • nice! explained like a grammar guru – asgs Jun 30 '17 at 20:38
2

"difficult for me" is correct. The Merriam-Webster dictionary provides usage examples including "These changes will make life difficult for everyone involved."

  • 1
    Also you would not say "so much difficult", just say "so difficult". If it is really worse, then "very difficult" or "really difficult". – user3169 Oct 4 '15 at 2:47
  • Correct: "It is so difficult for me to explain myself." Correct: "It is very difficult for me to explain myself." However you'll be safer saying "very difficult". Using "so difficult" requires that you have already provided an example. If you have been trying to explain something for two minutes you can say "It is so difficult to explain myself". You might say "I couldn't tell my friend what I was doing. It is so difficult to explain myself." – Readin Oct 4 '15 at 3:43
  • @Readin: Not necessarily. "so" is used as an intensifier as well as a comparative. To use as an intensifier, stress the word "so" (and/or "difficult") when saying the semtence. "It is so difficult to express myself!" The example you gave as a comparative is actually two distinct thoughts. To make it comparative, reverse order and add that.: "It is so difficult to express myself that I couldn't tell my friend what I was doing." – Brian Hitchcock Oct 4 '15 at 12:22
2

I think we can use these formulas:

"...difficult for somebody to do something."

Example: it is difficult for him to learn English at his age.

"... difficult to do something."

Example: It is difficult to learn English when you getting old.

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