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Ivan laughed and said: "Well, I will go and arrange matters so that Tarras may have his share," whereupon Tarras took the brown mare with the grain to town, leaving Ivan with one old horse to work on as before and support his father, mother, and sister. -Ivan the Fool, Leo Tolstoy-

I learned that whereupon is a conjunction, which can be used as below.

He told her she was a liar, whereupon she walked out.

About the sentence I quoted from the book Ivan the Fool, I want to know if this sentence is a grammatically correct one (if it is a complete sentence).

I thought this one should not be whereupon S+V, ~ing, but whereupon S+V, S+V

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    Your quote is incomplete. I've just checked it on Gutenberg.org. Here is the full sentence: Ivan laughed and said: "Well, I will go and arrange matters so that Tarras may have his share," whereupon Tarras took the brown mare with the grain to town, leaving Ivan with one old horse to work on as before and support his father, mother, and sister. – Damkerng T. Oct 5 '15 at 11:31
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    In other words, it already was "S+V, whereupon S+V, {participle clause}". – Victor Bazarov Oct 5 '15 at 12:30
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it was based on a misquote, which is now corrected in the question. As a result, the question answers itself. – Karen Dec 30 '15 at 18:34
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From the comments on the original post, I gather the grammar question has been answered via editing, so this just general word usage for whereupon.

In this context, whereupon means that the action after the conjunction is happening just after—and possibly in response to (or as a result of)—the action before the conjunction.

Breaking the sentences apart [and adding some extra literal parts], we have:

Ivan laughed and said: "Well, I will go and arrange matters so that Tarras may have his share."

[ Ivan went and arranged matters. ]

[ Then, immedately after that, and because of it, ] Tarras took the brown mare with the grain to town, leaving Ivan with one old horse to work on as before and support his father, mother, and sister.

Whereupon, by the way, is a largely obsolete word in English. For whatever reason, its popularity has declined over the course of the last century; as such, you'll mostly find it in old books, or contemporary writing trying to sound old.

The following sentences without whereupon mean about the same as the quoted one:

Ivan laughed and said: "Well, I will go and arrange matters so that Tarras may have his share," at which point Tarras took the brown mare and...

Ivan laughed and said: "Well, I will go and arrange matters so that Tarras may have his share," after which Tarras took the brown mare and...

Ivan laughed and said: "Well, I will go and arrange matters so that Tarras may have his share," and so Tarras took the brown mare and...

Ivan laughed, and agreed that Tarras should have his share. Once matters had been arranged, Tarras took the brown mare and...

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