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I was about to ask a question in this site and I am confused how to ask that question. I wrote a part of that question that made me confused on how to ask.

This is a sentence which is a short version of a long one (1- that I re-wrote) (2-with no difference in the sentence structure) that I'm confused with.

Where should number "1" and "2" be in this sentence? Are they ok?

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  • Post the the full question you want to ask. It doesn't matter if you make a grammatical mistake when asking a question – most of the time we'll be able to work out what you mean and we'll be able to answer your question. If we can't understand part of your question, we'll just ask you to clarify. Oct 6, 2015 at 7:54
  • @GrahamNicol I'm asking if that sentence ("This is sentence which is a short.....") is grammatical correct.
    – Bora
    Oct 6, 2015 at 8:00
  • Not correct if phrase 1 and 2 remain in the position as they are. Very difficult to understand. Oct 6, 2015 at 8:10
  • . . . that I'm confused about.
    – user230
    Jul 6, 2016 at 21:47

2 Answers 2

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I think one of the biggest challenges with English is its flexibility. There are a couple of ways you could work that sentence. Here's one way:

  • This sentence is a short version of a longer sentence which I've rewritten without changing the structure, and I'm confused with it.

You could also break it up:

  • This sentence is a short version of a longer sentence. I've rewritten it without changing the structure. I'm confused with it.

To answer your question more directly, 1 and 2 are fine in the order they're in.

"Which" is an interesting word; usually it's used (as a determiner) when you're adding descriptive information about something: "This is my car, which has a 2.4l motor.", or "This cat, which is a tabby, eats a lot of cat food." If I were keeping your sentence a little more intact, I might write it like this:

  • This sentence, which is a short version of a long version that I rewrote, keeping the sentence structure intact, is making me confused.

One other thing: you have two independent clauses in your sentence (and I apologize; this can be a little confusing):

  • This is a sentence I wrote
  • I am confused

Usually in English you would have two sentences, one for each clause, or you'd join them with a conjunction:

  • This is a sentence I wrote, and I'm confused with it.

The weird thing here is that this clause:

  • a version that I rewrote

. . . doesn't really count as a clause, because it's being used to describe the noun "sentence". So we treat that as a big adjective.

Anyway, I hope that's helpful, at least a little bit.

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I am not sure i completely know what you want, but here is my attempt.

"This is a sentence which is a short version of a long version that i re-wrote keeping the sentence structure the same as the short one, but found confused about."

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  • Thanks for the answer. What about this: "This is a sentence which is a short version of a long version that i re-wrote keeping the sentence structure the same as the short one, that I'm confused with."
    – Bora
    Oct 6, 2015 at 8:13
  • When using "confuse with", there must at least be two things, i.e. confuse A with B. You may look this phrase up in longman dictionary. Oct 6, 2015 at 8:15

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