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Sentence 1: They can delegate the computation of intersection an unlimited number of times. Sentence 2: They can delegate the computation of an unlimited number of intersection.

Question: Do the two above sentences have the same meaning? Are they both correct?

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No, they do not have the same meaning, and the second is not grammatically correct.

They can delegate the computation of intersection an unlimited number of times.

This means that "the computation of intersection" can be delegated an unlimited number of times.

They can delegate the computation of an unlimited number of intersection.

It should probably read "an unlimited number of intersections.

This means that it is "the computation of an unlimited number of intersections" that can be delegated.

  • In context, they MIGHT mean the same thing. But the first sentence might mean that the computation of the same intersection could be delegated repeatedly, while the second sentence can only mean that there are many intersections whose computation is being delegated. – Jay Oct 8 '15 at 14:01

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