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I would like to ask which sentences would a native speaker use for the following scenarios :

You have been running for an hour and then you bump into your friends.You both keeps on running without any stop in the same direction now.

Your friend : hey, how are you doing?

You : Good, I am running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

Good , I have been running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.


You have been running for an hour and then you decide to sit down on a bench in the park. While you are resting you come across your friend.So you are not running now but it did not past for a long time after you had sat down.

Your friend : hey, how are you doing? ( you look tired)

You : Good, I have been running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

Good, I have run for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

Good, I ran for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

2

For both scenarios, the present perfect continuous/progressive tense

Good, I have been running for one hour and I feel exhausted now

is grammatical and natural. The other answers agree that this is fine for the first scenario.


This tense is also natural and grammatical for the second scenario.

Consider the following websites that show that this tense can be used for a past action recently stopped

1 Wikipedia

This construction is used for ongoing action in the past that continues right up to the present or has recently finished

2 Present perfect continuous for continuous events that have just finished

The present perfect continuous tense is used to refer to continuous events that started in the past and have just finished but have a result in or an effect on the present moment.

3 http://www.englishtenses.com/tenses/present_perfect_continuous

examples:

I have been waiting for you for half an hour! (I'm not waiting anymore because you have come.)

Look at her eyes! I'm sure she has been crying. (She stopped crying when she saw them)

4 http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/tenses/present_perfect_progressive.htm

The PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE TENSE indicates a continuous action that has been finished at some point in the past or that was initiated in the past and continues to happen. The action is usually of limited duration and has some current relevance: "She has been running and her heart is still beating fast." The present perfect progressive frequently is used to describe an event of the recent past; it is often accompanied by just in this usage: "It has just been raining."

0

I am not a native speaker, so I would probably use "have been" in the first instance:

Your friend: hey, how are you doing?
You: Good , I have been running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.


And in the second instance I'd either use Past Perfect

Your friend : hey, how are you doing? (you look tired)
You: Good, I had run for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

or Past Indefinite

Your friend : hey, how are you doing? (you look tired)
You: Good, I ran for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

or Past Continuous

Your friend : hey, how are you doing? (you look tired)
You: Good, I was running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

or Past Perfect Continuous

Your friend : hey, how are you doing? (you look tired)
You: Good, I had been running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

All that because by the time the conversation commences, the running is in the past.

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  • But the present perfect continuous/progressive is used for events that recently stopped (see my answer).
    – user20792
    Nov 7 '15 at 23:04
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First scenario:

I would use present perfect continuous here; this is the exact situation it's designed for.

Good , I have been running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

This tense expresses that at some point in the past, you started running. Since then and until now, you still ran, and continue to run in the present.

Second scenario:

This requires some form of past tense. You've completed the run, and you are no longer running, so present perfect continuous is out. Any continuous tense that encompasses the present is out, in fact. Past continuous is okay, because it expresses that at some point in the past, you did something for an extended period of time, but it's ended now. Simple past tense is perfectly acceptable as well.

One notable exception is "present perfect" tense. I put the name in scare quotes because the tense doesn't really refer to the present, or at least not usually. It refers to some unspecified time before now. You can use this tense, as well.

Simple past:

Good, I ran for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

or

Past continuous:

Good, I was running for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

or

Present perfect:

Good, I have run for one hour and I feel exhausted now.

Note: "Run" is the past participle form of "run." Yeah, I know.

Past perfect tenses are not necessary here because there is no other event to compare this one to in terms of timeline. We usually use perfect tenses to differentiate events from each other in a timeline. Past perfect would be used if the sentence was worded like this:

Good, I had been running for one hour, then I went into the shop for a bottled water.

This expresses that you ran first, then you went into the shop afterwards. However, both events happened before now. My usage of the word "then" makes it slightly redundant ("then" makes it very clear which event preceded the other), but the principle is the same.

If you met the friend several hours later at a pub, the conversation might go something like this:

Friend: Hey, how was your day?

You: Good. I had been running for an hour earlier, then I felt exhausted.

This works because felt is used instead of feel which places it in the past, which means that now you can use past perfect to express that you ran before you felt exhausted.

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  • Yes, you are correct, regular present perfect tense works too because despite the confusing name, it is used for some unspecified time before the present. I will add that to the answer.
    – Crazy Eyes
    Oct 8 '15 at 19:08
  • Which one sounds more causal for the second scenario?
    – Amanda21
    Oct 8 '15 at 20:23
  • @Amanda21 They are the same, except saying "I have ran" sounds more formal than saying "I've ran" or the other two sentences. "I have" is usually contracted except when using "have" as the main verb of a sentence, i.e. "I have a lot of tomatoes." When used as a helping verb, it is usually contracted in colloquial speech. To my knowledge, in British English "I have" is frequently contracted even when it is the main verb, but that is not the case in American English.
    – Crazy Eyes
    Oct 8 '15 at 20:28
  • First, the present perfect tense always refers to the present (it is, indeed, a present tense). Second, the present perfect continuous/progressive is used for activities that have recently stopped.
    – user20792
    Nov 7 '15 at 23:11

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