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My father's voice is hoarse since yesterday and we were shocked .

My father's voice is hoarse since yesterday and we were being shoked .

Based on my perception, the second sentence does imply that we actually were not shocked, but we pretended as if we were shocked. We acted like a shocked person.

When want to make a verbal statement, I just make the second sentence, and if it means like that,that would be a lexical mistake, wouldn't it?

  • There is a lack of coherence here in my opinion. Why were you shocked, but are not now? Additionally, I think if your father's voice is still hoarse, you should say "has been" in place of "is". – JMB Oct 14 '15 at 6:56
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To my native American English ear, the first statement is understandable, but not what someone would say. Instead,

We were shocked that my father's voice has been hoarse since yesterday.

The second one just doesn't sound right. I think you are trying to say that:

We have been in a continuous state of shock because my (our?) father's voice has been hoarse since yesterday.

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The first sentence is believe is perfectly fine, to paraphrase it: We were shocked because of my father's hoarse voice since yesterday.

The second though, I can't seem to follow your perception. How I would interpret this would be: Because of your father's hoarse voice since yesterday, something is shocking you (an external factor not directly relating to your father's hoarse voice.

If you want to convey the message of we are acting shocked simply put it like this:

My father's voice was hoarse since yesterday and we acted like we were shocked.

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