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I think you may not have eaten anything for breakfast.

I think you would have eaten something for breakfast.

Does the second sentence mean :

I think you would have eaten something - actually you did not eat something,

Am I correct?

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Firstly, no they don't mean the same thing.

The first means that the person thinks that there is a higher chance that you have not eaten anything for breakfast.

The second means that he thinks that you would have eaten something, but did not due to some external factor. So, yes you are partially correct for the assumption.

I’m not sure if my explanation is enough as will welcome any other suggestions.

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As with Cipher's answer, they do not mean the same thing.

Both questions indicate probability but not on the same intensity as the other. The first sentence says that there is a high possibility that the one being asked did NOT eat anything for breakfast. I guess the second one, in my opinion, is asked on a more personal level since you might have known the person for always eating his breakfast.

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"I think you may not have eaten anything for breakfast." - Indicates only a possibility that "you" had a probability of eating breakfast, out of personal preference.

"I think you would have eaten something for breakfast." - Indicates that "you" were required, somehow, to eat your breakfast.

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The first question means that the person is not completely sure of his/her assumption.

The second question may sound similar as the first, but in my opinion, it means that the person assumed that he/she should have already eaten, but didn't for some reason.

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