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I learnt from this answer that the relative pronoun cannot be omitted in the following sentence:

I have a lived experience and I think one of the challenges with regards to mental illness compared to physical injuries, is physical injuries are easy to digest.

But in this episode of the Australia talk show QandA, an AFL player Wayne Schwass used this pattern several times. I just wonder if this is allowed and normal in daily life.

...because what I will say is what you've done is someone in that auditorium or hall is having the same challenges that they’re facing and your story has connected with them and they’ve probably got some inspiration out of what you’ve done,...

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    I can't see a relative pronoun in your first sentence. – Araucaria - Not here any more. Oct 15 '15 at 14:29
  • It is helpful if you highlight the word(s) in question in you examples. – user3169 Oct 15 '15 at 16:27
  • There is nothing wrong with your first sentence, and it doesn't seem to be addressed by the answer you link to. – Peter Shor Oct 15 '15 at 17:03
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I suspect what you're asking about is this omission:

I think one of the challenges with regards to mental illness compared to physical injuries, is that physical injuries are easy to digest.

But in this case that is not a relative pronoun; it's called a subordinating conjunction in traditional grammar or a subordinator or complementizer in more recent grammars.

  • Relative that signals the presence of a 'gap' (a missing constituent) in the following clause and "relates" that gap to a constituent in the head clause.

  • Complementizer that signals that the following full clause is to be treated as a nominal constituent in the main clause—as it does in this very sentence.

Omission of complementizer that is very frequent in speech, both British and American, and this is often acceptable in written English, too. However, I advise against omitting it in writing unless your sentence structure is simple: it helps the reader sort out how your sentence is put together.

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