0

Jane was bored with the food in our workplace's carteen.
She wanted me to recommend her some better places to dine out.
I told her that "ABC food store is well-known for Tempura and milk bread..."
To give her some idea what else ABC food store sells, I said,
(1). ABC food store is like Delifrance.

Now I am home, and I am wondering whether there are any differences in meaning in the following sentences:

(1). ABC food store is like Delifrance.
(2). ABC food store is Delifrance-like.

Thank you.

  • 1
    I would use "similar to", and not use -like outside of literary or really informal usage. – user3169 Oct 19 '15 at 22:06
3

The difference is purely syntactical.

When you say

ABC food store is like Delifrance.

you describe "ABC food store" (using the preposition "like") as resembling "Delifrance" (another store, supposedly known to your hearer).

When you say

ABC food store is Delifrance-like.

you describe "ABC food store" as resembling "Delifrance" by combining that word with the "-like" to form an adjective.

The meaning is the same.

However, grammatically there are some implications. For instance, if you want to express a very close resemblance between the two, you would use "very much" in the former case, and "very" in the latter:

ABC food store is very much like Delifrance.
ABC food store is very Delifrance-like.

That is because in the first sentence you modify a preposition, and in the second you modify an adjective.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.