0

Its a sentence written by a school kid.

Not only can they (school activities) help us to be physically stronger, but can break the routine to provide relaxation as well.

4

Not quite. The second phrase needs a subject or a connector to the subject in the first phrase.

Not only can they (school activities) help us to be physically stronger, but they can break the routine to provide relaxation as well.

or

Not only can they (school activities) help us to be physically stronger, but can also break the routine to provide relaxation as well.

0

Not only can they (school activities) help us to be physically stronger, but they can break the routine to provide relaxation as well.

or

Not only can they (school activities) help us to be physically stronger, but they can also break the routine to provide relaxation.

You can either use "Not only... but... as well" or "Not only... but... also"

0

I think the proper intention is expressed with:

Not only can they (school activities) help us be physically stronger, but they can also break the routine and provide relaxation as well.

Note: I removed to from: help us **to** be physically stronger - there is no strike-trough option to "delete" text.

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