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I think I've heard this sentence, but I'm not sure if it is grammatically correct.

Example:

"I have seen three films in the last week. I didn't like the first, I liked the second, but I liked the third best."

Is this colloquial, or wrong? is this form acceptable in formal speech?

Is it used only when there are many things taken into account?

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    Quite fine, actually. Use it with more than two items. With two you usually say "better". – Victor Bazarov Oct 28 '15 at 16:55
  • and can I say "I like it best when people are honest with each other?". in this case there are just two "items" or "options": being honest and not being honest. – AltGei Oct 28 '15 at 19:11
  • Yes, you can say that, and no, it's not two items, honest and not honest. One can be secretive without telling lies, for instance. It's not true dishonesty, at least some don't think so. People can be contemptuous to others, servile, and so on. – Victor Bazarov Oct 28 '15 at 19:25
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I have seen three films in the last week. I didn't like the first. I liked the second, but I liked the third best.

You can say I have seen three films in the last week. I liked the third best or most.

But in you statement, you are comparing two films. You say: I didn't like the first. I liked the second, but I liked the third best. So, I think, you should say: I liked the third much better or I liked the third better than the second.

| improve this answer | |
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    For me, the tense use OP is using is fine. He's saying "in the last week", not " last week". – JMB Oct 28 '15 at 21:50
  • JMB, I think you are right. I have edited my answer accordingly. Thanks. – Khan Oct 29 '15 at 6:48

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