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Is the usage of "and" correct in the following sentence:

This characterization was provided for the symmetric system with single and multiple rate levels and the general system?

should I insert a "for" after "levels" ?

I am trying to express the following idea:

This characterization was provided for the symmetric system with single rate level, for the symmetric system with multiple rate levels and for the general system.

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I think what you're trying to say is:

This characterization was provided for the symmetric system with a single rate level, for the symmetric system with multiple rate levels, and for the general system.

I just added a comma after the levels, and "a" before single.

This characterization was provided for the symmetric system with single and multiple rate levels and the general system.

The multiple use of "and" in the above sentence without any commas makes parsing it mind numbing. This would be better:

This characterization was provided for the symmetric system with single and multiple rate levels, and for the general system.

Added a comma after levels and a "for" in the general system phrase. Like this version the best.

  • Could you please tell me how I can add the following idea: "This characterization was provided for the symmetric system with a single rate level, for the symmetric system with multiple rate levels, and for the general system, under both the perfect and imperfect cases". I want to say that this characterization was provided for each of this 3 scenarios under (or for) the prefect case and the imperfect case. Thank you!! – tam Oct 29 '15 at 9:57
  • This characterization was considered both the perfect case and the imperfect case for each of the three scenarios, the symmetric system with single and multiple rate levels, and for the general system. – MaxW Oct 29 '15 at 15:03

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