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But this close relation between revolutionary sentiments and the needs of the Jewish striving for emancipation hasn’t escaped the attention of the Russian, as of some other governments. It therefore hates and persecutes the Jews as much as the revolutionary tendencies, and does everything in its power to incite and intensify hatred of Jews in the population.

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2014/04/29/semi-a29.html

I am not sure if I understand the bold part of the sentence. Does it mean that the Russian government was not the only one that saw the "relation between revolutionary sentiments and the needs of the Jewish striving for emancipation"?

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    I don't think this is a normal usage. But my guess would be as well as some other governments. But I don't know if that works in context. – user3169 Oct 31 '15 at 18:45
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I was able to find the German text of the Kautsky's article on the web. In it you find the sentence in question:

Dieser enge Zusammenhang zwischen dem revolutionären Empfinden und den Bedürfnissen des jüdischen Emanzipationsstrebens ist aber, wie so mancher anderen Regierung, auch der russischen nicht entgangen.

Google (crudely of course) translates it to

This close connection between the revolutionary sentiment and the needs of the Jewish emancipation aspirations, however, like many other government, even the Russian did not escape.

So, the translation from which the quote was spliced into the text you read, was rather loose and a bit imperfect.

Whoever translated it changed "so mancher andered" ("so many other") to "some" and decided to mention Russian government first. If we were to bring it closer to the original, it ought to be

But this close relation between revolutionary sentiments and the needs of the Jewish striving for emancipation hasn’t escaped the attention of the Russian, as well as of many other governments.

(note that 'user3169' suggested it, and I also had the same inkling when I read your question, that's why I went to investigate. I am not sure of the correctness of Present Perfect either)

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