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My colleague, JJ was promoted as the shop's temporary supervisor when the boss was touring a foreign country.
He was given a bunch of keys of the shop's iron gate, doors, and most importantly, the safety deposit box (which kept the shop's cash transaction).

For the bunch of keys that I have mentioned in my question, I am wondering if there is a professional or specific name for it?
Is this bunch of keys called functional key or important key or something?
Thank you

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    How about "office keys" or "shop keys"? Without referring to them individually, I would expect all are important otherwise locks would not be needed. – user3169 Nov 3 '15 at 17:18
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Keys are keys, be it a shop's iron gate, doors, etc.. I don't think there is such thing as "functional keys." There is something called function key, but function key is a very different thing, unrelated to locks and doors.

You can call it a key set.

The key which the bank uses for safe deposit box is called a "guard key."

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    +1 for key set. This implies that there is a standard group of keys that someone in his position would have, and he is being given them all at once. This usage is not specific to keys, of course. You might give a draftsman a pen set or dog groomer a brush and comb set. A key that does have a special name is the master key - a key that can open a variety of locks. Perhaps each worker has the key to his or her own locker, and the supervisor has a single master keys that can open all of the lockers. A skeleton key is a special kind of master key. – Adam Nov 3 '15 at 17:04
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    Thanks, Usernew. So, can I say, JJ was given a bunch of key set or JJ was given a key set? – kitty Nov 4 '15 at 12:43
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    @kitty You can either say JJ was given a bunch of keys or JJ was given a key set If you say was given a bunch of key set, it would be wrong, as far as I know. – Usernew Nov 4 '15 at 13:13
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    @kitty Read Adam's comment; It says, "...key set. This implies that there is a standard group of keys that someone in his position would have, and he is being given them all at once." Now if you also use the noun "bunch," it would change the meaning. Maybe it will mean that JJ was given more than one key set. Something like that. – Usernew Nov 4 '15 at 13:24
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As a group of keys, I would call them office keys or shop keys.

Without referring to them individually, I would expect all are important otherwise locks would not be needed.

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Keys are keys unless you are talking about the material they are made up of (say golden keys!)! At the most, 'important keys' can be used or else, it's just fine.

I'm not sure whether to use 'functional' for them. Because 'functional' means something which is functioning. So, unless you have another bunch of keys that are not working/functioning, calling them with that term won't make better sense.

Here are the keys, important keys works fine without any ambiguity.

  • Can we put the word 'functional' before the keys necessary for office-related work, or say function? – Rucheer M Nov 3 '15 at 11:08
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    @RuchirM functional is functional. This means the keys are 'functioning' irrespective of the place you are talking about! – Maulik V Nov 3 '15 at 11:09

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