1

We have three Figures, Fig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3

I intend to imply :

In Fig. 2, we have more details and it has better resolution which let us judge about the content more accurately; this judgment is a roughly hard task if we use Fig.1 or Fig. 3.

I have written down:

Fig. 2 provide close observations that we cannot have in Fig. 1 and Fig. 3.


Q1 : Is my sentence correct ?

Q2: Is there any better substitution ?

5
  • If you're looking for a phrase to describe Fig. 2, I'd suggest higher fidelity.
    – LawrenceC
    Nov 10, 2015 at 15:01
  • What should I say ? It gives higher fidelity ? It provides higher fidelity ? or ... ?
    – Cardinal
    Nov 10, 2015 at 15:24
  • The figure would have higher fidelity, or be a higher fidelity - e.g. "Fig. 2's higher fidelity allows us to make observations not afforded otherwise."
    – LawrenceC
    Nov 10, 2015 at 17:03
  • 3
    There are hundreds of ways to say this, but I personally would use something like, "Figure 2 allows closer examination of the content due to its greater detail and better resolution, as compared to figures 1 and 3." Jan 9, 2016 at 23:47
  • Are Fig1, Fig2, and Fig3 the same picture just different resolutions, or is Fig1 and Fig3 zoomed out, or are Fig1 and Fig3 different areas of Fig2?
    – Peter
    Feb 9, 2016 at 0:06

2 Answers 2

1

In Fig. 2, we have more details and it has better resolution which let us judge about the content more accurately; this judgment is a roughly hard task if we use Fig.1 or Fig. 3.

You can say exactly that, followed by the conclusions that the differences allow you to make. Something like

Fig. 2, having better resolution and more detail than Fig. 1 and Fig. 3, allows us to make observations not afforded otherwise.

0

To stick with your example as much as possible,

Fig. 2 provides close-up observations that are difficult to see in Fig. 1 and Fig. 3.

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