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Any section of code that should be finished by each process that begins it before another process can enter it is called a critical region.

i'm trying to understand the meaning but it's too complicated. can anyone simplify this? it's from "Understanding the linux kernel" by O'Rilley

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Here is the main part of the sentence:

Any section of code that should be finished by each process that begins it before another process can enter it is called a critical region.

What kind of section of code is it?
It's a section of code that:

should be finished by each process that begins it before another process can enter it

In other words, a critical region is any section of code that if a process begins it, that process should finish it before any other process can enter it (i.e., that section of code; that critical region).

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{Any section of code}subject {that should be finished by each process {that begins it}rel.clause before {another process can enter it}rel.clause}rel.clause {is called}predicate {a critical region}object.

Perhaps the only really complicated part of it is the nested subordinate clauses:

that should be finished by each process {that begins it}rel.clause before {another process can enter it}rel.clause

In the original sentence the "it" (appearing twice) refers to "any section of code" (the main subject).

The contracted version might be

Any section of code {that has some special requirements}rel.clause is called a critical section.

The special requirements are expressed by the nested clauses extracted above.

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