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Which is the correct sentence?

Will it be solved?
Would it be solved?

What are the differences between these two?

closed as off-topic by snailcar, pyobum, ColleenV, jimsug, Maulik V Nov 16 '15 at 5:28

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  • We can't tell which sentence works without context. We don't know what you're trying to communicate, what the situation is, what you're responding to . . . – snailcar Nov 16 '15 at 2:26
  • @snailboat: The title question is perfectly proper. The embedded question ("which is correct?") is a reasonable question for someone not understanding the nuances of English and assuming that only one would be correct. If I could, I would vote to reopen. – wallyk Nov 16 '15 at 16:34
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Which is the correct sentence?
Will it be solved?
Would it be solved?

Both sentences are correct English. But they have different meanings.

What are the differences between these two?

Will it be solved? asks the question Is it solvable? Without additional context or qualification, it means *Will it ever be solved?*

Would it be solved? is bounded in time. For instance, in the middle of hearing or reading a story, this question asks if some mystery is solved by the end of the story.

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Will it be solved?

Will is present tense so the solution could happen from the present to some time in the future.

Would it be solved?

Would is a past tense of will. The question is posed about a past where the problem hasn't been solved. It is ambiguous if the problem has currently been solved or not.