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"Thank for confirming your attendance for the BoV dinner" or "at the BoV dinner"?

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    Better than either: "Thank you for confirming that you will attend the BoV dinner". Confirming your attendance would be used to mean confirming that you attended. – StoneyB on hiatus Nov 18 '15 at 22:06
  • After correcting "Thank" to "Thank you," I don't see any problem with the first statement. It can also apply to confirm that you will attend. Now if it was "confirming your attendance at BoV dinner," that would be confirming that you did attend. – mkennedy Nov 19 '15 at 20:43
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"Thank for confirming your attendance for the BoV dinner" means that either you are confirming an attendance on behalf of the BoV dinner, or to meet the purposes of the BoV dinner.

"Thank for confirming your attendance at the BoV dinner" is better than the first, but a strict interpretation means that you are confirming an actual attendance that is happening right now or has happened in the past, rather than confirming a future intent of attendance.

Any of the following are better. The constructions with "that you will" are more formal that those with "you'll".

Thank you for confirming
... that you will attend the BoV dinner
... you'll attend the BoV dinner.
... that you will be attending the BoV dinner
... you'll be attending the BoV dinner

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  • You can't just start a sentence with "thank". – Catija Mar 1 '17 at 13:49

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