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There is the word "genderless" (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/genderless), however there is no such word as "genderful", so what word should I use instead?

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    Also see sexed, “having a sex; being male or female” – James Waldby - jwpat7 Jun 16 '13 at 18:36
  • @jwpat7: Also "having been assigned a sex" - which in the case of two-day-old male chicks is an assignment I'm sure they'd rather forego! – FumbleFingers Jun 17 '13 at 20:45
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    I would just say "gendered"; "gendered" is to have gender, "genderless" is to be without it. – WendiKidd Jun 17 '13 at 22:52
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It depends on the exact context, but often just gender would work...

1: If one wished to apply adelphoi specifically to one gender or the other, one had to couple it with a gender noun.

In other contexts (or simply through stylistic preference) you could use gendered...

2: The relationship between a gendered division of work and a gendered division of dominance was a crucial issue.

But probably the most "general-purpose" form is gender-based...

3: Similarly, a gender-based analysis that considers sexual orientation would be essential to understanding the often troubled political and social relationships between lesbians and gay men.

A few people have used genderised, but I wouldn't recommend that one at the moment. Though I can imagine it becoming more useful in future, if and when biotechnology advances to the point where we routinely force a "non-sex-differentiated cell" to definitely become one sex or the other.

  • Good answer! Genderised is interesting. I haven't heard it before, and I don't much like the sound of it--too much like tenderised, I think. – snailboat Jun 18 '13 at 9:18

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