1

can you please tell me if this sentence is understanable to native speaker and is it common to say it like this?

Besides being used as a stand-alone module, (the module's name) can work in the integration with our module.

3
  • What is the source of the sentence? Did you write it yourself? What is the relationship between the module (being used as a stand-alone module) and our module?
    – user24743
    Nov 26, 2015 at 19:43
  • 3
    Most of the time, choosing whether to use an article depends a great deal on context. It would help if you could include some of the surrounding context. That way people will be able to figure out whether an article is appropriate :-)
    – user230
    Nov 26, 2015 at 20:05
  • One English language enthusiast believes that in the integration could actually be felicitous. I could not persuade him to post his own answer though. (0: Nov 26, 2015 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

5

"In integration" seems not very felicitous (P.S. although it could be; I'm not sure).

I would say

Besides being used as a stand-alone module, (the module's name) can work in combination with our module.

I've just googled up another possible expression:

Besides being used as a stand-alone module, (the module's name) can work in conjunction with our module.

Or, per Riley Francisco's comment below,

Besides being used as a stand-alone module, (the module's name) can be used in conjunction with our module.


(I'm not a native speaker, wait for more answers)

13
  • You never know if you can or can't use the before those words without any context.
    – user24743
    Nov 26, 2015 at 19:27
  • @Rathony - agreed. That's why I used the word here: in this particular context. I'll stress this point further now. Thank you for the comment. Nov 26, 2015 at 19:28
  • 3
    Great answer, I was just about to write my answer when you used in conjunction and in combination. Well done. Nov 26, 2015 at 19:28
  • 2
    You could also say " ...can be used in conjunction with our module." Nov 26, 2015 at 19:30
  • 3
    @Rathony - I would pigeonhole it as "phrase-request", since it relates to the use of a particular phrase. We should give posters some wiggle room. (0: Not every English learner can phrase exactly what they need, and coming up with a rough sentence to illustrate the use of a necessary phrase is not that bad, IMHO. Nov 26, 2015 at 19:42
2

How about module A is (fully) compatible with module B?

2
  • Probably too clear for technical writers to use... ;)
    – user20792
    Nov 26, 2015 at 23:27
  • Nothing improves the quality of a technical paper better than a pinch of ambiguity ;)
    – BR41N-FCK
    Nov 27, 2015 at 9:45

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .