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What is acceptable form sentence in the spoken English?

1) I will see you in another time

or

2) I will see you at another time

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There is an answer here that says, in part,

we could label at as referring to specific times, and in to refer to relatively nonspecific times (During a month, a season, a year, a decade, a century, a nonspecific period of time); while on refers to specific days and dates.

I would modify in to refer to a nonspecific period of time. So I would reject "in another time" since "another time" is not a period of time.

I would choose "at another time" since "another time" is a specific time, even though "another" has no precise meaning.

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  • This is correct. It's kind of analogous to location: you can be at a particular location, or you can be in an area. – Era Dec 3 '15 at 21:01
  • You're pretty much right, but at the end of the day I think the question is simply a dup of your link. It's perfectly possible to say, for example, that was in another time (somewhen during some relatively non-specific earlier age, period), whereas at another time means a specific time (often, not too far distant from whatever time it's being contrasted with). If OP were talking to a time-traveler (Dr Who, for example), in might well be the better choice. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Dec 3 '15 at 21:12
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The former is needlessly science-fiction-y, or relativistic, if you will.

The latter is actually correct, but kind of lame.

Normally one would say, "I'll see you some other time" and leave it at that.

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