1
  • We had no sooner started the work than he closed the door.
  • The work had no sooner been started than he closed the door.
  • The work had no sooner been started, when he closed the door.

The last two sentences are the passive constructions of first one, though I don't think that the meanings of last two are same. Please say what you think. Which one from last two is more common?

If I write the following sentence, is the meaning of it same to the first active construction?

  • No sooner had we started the work than he closed the door.
  • than makes no sense there but when does. – Alejandro Dec 4 '15 at 17:50
  • @ustanak actually, it is the convention to use 'than' with 'no sooner'. Using 'when' would just be wrong. – N A Feb 19 '16 at 1:59
-1

'No sooner' is always paired with 'than'. Using 'when' in the third sentence makes it wrong. The other sentence all mean just about the same thing. However, some are a little awkwardly written. When using 'no sooner', it's best to start the sentence with it: 'No sooner had ... than ...'. For that reason, the last sentence is probably the best of the lot.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.