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What's the shortest phrase to describe sites like Stack Exchange? It's not a forum, it's Questions-and-Answers site, which is quite a long phrase, and not very precise (because it's the site with questions with answers).

Is there any short phrase that I can use to describe Stack Exchange?

For example:

I'm active participant of the [phrase] called English Language Learners.

  • Questions and Answers implies that the two are linked based on experience with Q/A sites, even though it isn't implied via raw English. – Ryan Leonard Jan 23 '13 at 21:55
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You pretty much answered it yourself. At the top of the page, in fact, you can find Stack Exchange's way of describing themselves:

Stack Exchange is a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites.

  • When writing, OK, but when speaking? How to spell Q&A and will it be commonly understood? – Danubian Sailor Jan 23 '13 at 21:52
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    @lechlukasz Question and Answer is the easiest method of saying Q&A, although you could also say each letter "Q and A" – Ryan Leonard Jan 23 '13 at 21:53
  • I would expect "Q and A site" to be universally understood. That phrase has been around long enough. There are variants like "Q and A session" (generally held at the end of a meeting or conference) – TecBrat Oct 1 '13 at 12:47
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As Squazic, I'd call that, by order of increasing length:

  • Q&A (3 syllables : ”Q and A”)
  • Q&A site (4)
  • Q&A website (5)
  • Question and Answers website (7)
  • Website with questions and answers about English (12)

Longer than that, you'd rather describe it enthusiastically, and invite he whom you're speaking with to join us :·)

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I agree with everything said, however if your learning English you should use the term website since site is not grammatically correct, although it is very commonly used. Q&A or Question and Answer are really very similar.

I'm active participant of the community question and answer website called English Language Learners.

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    How is it not grammatically correct? "Site" and "website" are both common nouns and are in exactly parallel constructions here. – Mechanical snail Feb 7 '13 at 5:41

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