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I haven't used this sort of structures for quite a while in my writing experience, so it would be nice if someone helped me.

In a recent study researchers applied the said method to investigate microbial composition of 10 samples of varying geographical and agricultural affinity proving 9 of them significantly different and highlighting geographic area-specific peaks in most profiles.

Basically I'm not sure about the highlighted parts. The sentence is supposed to mean the following:

In a recent study researchers applied the said method to investigate microbial composition of 10 samples of varying geographical and agricultural affinity. They showed that 9 of the samples were significantly different and highlighted geographic area-specific peaks in most profiles.

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Clarity is our friend. The way your examples are worded is way too muddled and muddling for my taste (others might find them okay).

"Said" (in the sense of "aforementioned") does not really require an article ("aforementioned" does, though) and is, well, legalese. It shouldn't be used in non-legal documents unless the author is being ironic or sarcastic.

It would seem that in the preceding paragraph the method you're talking about is described. Why not say "this method," then?

Applying the method to investigate something sounds a bit awkward.

Proof is a pretty powerful concept. Were the researchers trying actually to prove, or merely demonstrate, something?

You use the words "geographical" and "geographic" in the same sentence, which is kind of redundant.

Since a certain number of peaks were highlighted in some of the profiles, an article is in order here.

With all of the above in mind, the resulting sentence should read something like this:

Applying this method in a recent study investigating the microbial composition of 10 samples of varying geographical and agricultural affinity, the researchers were able successfully to demonstrate that 9 of the samples were significantly different. In most of the profiles, the area-specific peaks were highlighted.

Or something.

  • I definitely appreciate all your recommendations and I will gladly accept the answer, if you clarify whether the way participle is used in my first example is correct. That was the main point of my question. – Eli Korvigo Dec 5 '15 at 22:38
  • @EliKorvigo: It is technically okay. That said, it is surrounded by so many words and concepts on either side, I really had to think hard to figure out what it was doing there and what it meant. – Ricky Dec 5 '15 at 23:00

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