2

Given the following sentence

When I arrived home I could not stop thinking about why I had agreed helping him.

The correct way of writing it is

When I arrived home I could not stop thinking about why I had agreed to help him.

Is the first sentence incorrect or carries a different meaning?

3

The word "Agree" has to be followed with a preposition. Thus, the first is incorrect.

"Agree" is commonly followed by "on", "to" or "with". In your case, the second sentence is correct as "to" is used with demands or requests.

  • 1
    The preposition is commonly dropped in British English. – Michael Hampton Dec 6 '15 at 12:28
  • Which one? The use of to? – Alejandro Dec 6 '15 at 12:32
3

The first sentence is incorrect.
You could change it to:

Why I had agreed with helping him.

and it would have the same meaning.

  • Why is incorrect? – Alejandro Dec 6 '15 at 3:50
  • Please see edit – Peter Dec 6 '15 at 3:52
  • I hadn't thought on adding with, it makes more sense. Is it because agree with stands for a phrasal verb? – Alejandro Dec 6 '15 at 3:57
  • 1
    I usually try to think of it as: one agreed "with" someone; or "to" something; or "about" something. Native speakers rarely think in terms of parts of speech. – Peter Dec 6 '15 at 4:04

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