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In ascertaining their intention, we must take account of those factors which favour an insistence on documents in such a form as will evidence with certainty a contract and the terms of that contract, factors expressed and underlined by Lord Greene.

Above is an extract from a legal judgement written by a judge, but it doesn't make sense to me, especially the "as will" part. Is this grammatically correct? Shouldn't it say "that will" or "as it will" instead?

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    Few documents written in legalese are supposed to make sense to those not in the legal profession. One reason is that they tend to stick with traditional language used in such documents. And this leads to using many stilted forms that one would not generally encounter elsewhere. Your interpretation here that "such as that" also gets the meaning across is a good one. Such [NP] as will... is legalese.
    – user20792
    Dec 9, 2015 at 9:40
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    My attempt: The documents must be presented in a particular form. What form? The kind of form that will allow us to clearly see that the document(s) represent(s) a contract, and that will allow us to clearly understand what the terms of this contract are. Both will and evidence are verbs here. Dec 9, 2015 at 11:24

4 Answers 4

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It's not "as will": it's "such [...] as"

One should try to post such questions as would give everyone an opportunity to learn something.

When going through the casting process one must select such performers as wouldn't make the composer, Giuseppe Verdi, turn in his grave.

Young architects should design such buildings as will present a luring opportunity for a cityscape artist rather than bore the hell out of him.

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we must take account of those factors which favour an insistence on documents in such a form as will evidence with certainty a contract and the terms of that contract,

"[something] as will [do something]" is equivalent in this case to "[something] which is going to [do some particular thing]"

It is further specifying the original something, stating that, of all the [somethings], only those [somethings] which also [do the particular thing] are [somethings] which are relevant.

e.g. Only [faces covered in red berry juice] are going to provide certain evidence that [the miscreant stole and ate the raspberries].

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There is nothing wrong with it, despite the fact that it looks disturbingly wrong.

Although, I'm fairly sure Ahmad Fraz is right with the 'legal' context.

..an insistence on documents in such a form as will evidence with certainty a contract and the terms of that contract

Let's break this down.

An insistence

On what?

On documents

Documents of what form?

In the form of will evidence

I believe it fits.

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    I'm afraid you're wrong. The documents must be presented in a particular form. What form? The kind of form that will allow us to clearly see that the document(s) represent(s) a contract, and that will allow us to clearly understand what the terms of this contract are. Dec 9, 2015 at 11:20
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1:- "Will" In Legal Language is "an official document that says what a person wants to be done with their assets after their death." She left him everything in her will. 2:- "Will" can also be defined as "what a person wants; a person's intentions in doing something (eg in making an agreement) Where it is not possible to understand the intention or will of the contracting parties, then the contract will be null and void.

SO in the above Question "documents in such a form as will evidence." A Legal document "will" has been referred, which is defined above.

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    Both of those are nouns, but "will" here is a verb. Dec 9, 2015 at 8:43

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