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I have a sentence that roughly says trends in technology have resulted in an agile infrastructure. Sentence is as below:

Network infrastructure is the backbone of any enterprise and the evolving trends in automation and virtualization are proving to effect an agile approach to the overall Infrastructure sector.

I'm unsure as to whether the preposition in should accompany effect. As in,

Network infrastructure is the backbone of any enterprise and the evolving trends in automation and virtualization are proving to effect in an agile approach to the overall Infrastructure sector.

  • @CopperKettle What I'm trying to convey is that: the trends have resulted in a more agile approach. – Caroffrey Dec 11 '15 at 6:44
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    It is a very good question +1. The nuance of effect and affect is well known to many. But I think using effect as a verb is something that makes this question a special one! :) – Maulik V Dec 11 '15 at 7:05
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    The first one is clearly correct. However, it's still not very clear what you're trying to say. How exactly does one "approach" a "sector" in an "agile" manner? The trends are evolving -- perhaps they are evolving rapidly, and this requires agility? – whywasinotconsulted Dec 16 '15 at 18:23
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+50

Okay, from your comment, it seems that you want to use 'effect' as a verb. Fine, considering that, I'd say that you don't require the preposition.

Check dictionaries that use the verb 'effect'. Check those examples further. They don't use the preposition to mean 'result in'.

The negotiators hoped to effect a smooth transition to an interim administration. - OALD
As a ​political ​party they are ​trying to effect a ​change in the way that we ​think about ​our ​environment. - Cambridge
If correctly administered, such drugs can effect radical cures. - MM

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    Agreed. Anyone using the verb to effect should be able to test fit to create or to cause without much change in meaning. To me, it connotes a choice, intent, or purpose that isn't required for to result in. – Gossar Dec 16 '15 at 9:31
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No, actually, the original sentence is correct (moronically worded as it may be).

What you have in mind is "result in". Which would also be correct, and make the sentence sound even more tedious.

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Effect does function as a verb when it bears the sense to bring about. For instance, it is the correct word in phrases such as effect change and effect solutions where these phrases mean to bring about change and to bring about solutions. It’s possible to imagine where the phrase affect change might make sense, but it would mean to have an effect on change rather than to bring about change.

this one is right:

Network infrastructure is the backbone of any enterprise and the evolving trends in automation and virtualization are proving to effect an agile approach to the overall Infrastructure sector.

are proving to effect ...

are proving to effect (what?)

an agile approach.

effect in implies it is functioning as a noun but a verb is always followed by "prove to".

this is a infinitive phrase:

to effect an agile approach to the overall Infrastructure sector.

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