1

I saw this sentence:

View this set of incremental lessons as a guided introduction to building your first app.

Why they use word "guided" before "introduction" ? it is an adj ?
Why "building" (V+ing) placed after "to" ? What is its meaning ?

  • Technically, "guided" is a past participle, which is a form of a verb (to guide) that works like an adjective. – stangdon Dec 11 '15 at 15:52
3

Yes, it is right.

View this set of incremental lessons as a guided introduction to building your first app.

"Building your first app(lication)" is a kind of activity. "Building" is a gerund: it works like a noun. Example:

Dancing is fun.
Building your first application is fun.
Building your first application can be hard without a teacher.

"Guided" is an adjective modifying the noun "introduction". The meaning is,

Guided: that is led by somebody who works as a guide (Oxford Learner's Dictionaries)

This set of video-lessons probably features a person who works as a guide. He or she guides the pupil, step by step, towards the completion of the pupil's first simple programming application. The pupil does not simply recieves some dry introductory information on how to create their first application: the video creates an appearance that there is a guide present beside the pupil, helping the pupil step-by-step, with each step requiring more knowledge and skill ("incremental lessons").

The word introduction usually takes a complement using the preposition to:

This is an introduction to dancing. ("dancing" is also a gerund)
This is an introduction to chemistry.
This is an introduction to C++.

In the last example, we use the prepositional phrase "to C++" in order to describe (complement) the noun "introduction". "C++" is a noun phrase, and "building your first app" works just like it.

This is an introduction to building your first app.

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