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So, she called me yesterday; we talked about a lot of stuff, and then she kind of slipped it out that it wouldn't be all that bad if I asked her out today. I found myself wondering how it'd go, and decided to give it a shot.

So, she had called me yesterday, we talked about a lot of stuff, and then she kind of slipped it out that it wouldn't be all that bad if I asked her out today. I had found myself wondering how it'd go, and decided to give it a shot.

Are both the above grammatically correct? What's the difference in their meaning?

  • Sidenote: I think the idiom is actually "she let it slip," not "she slipped it." – Alex K Dec 12 '15 at 19:17
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    i'll make sure to make it easier for the answerers from now on. :) – lekon chekon Dec 12 '15 at 19:30
  • Also I think "it'd" sounds a little odd. "It would" seems much more natural to me. – shawnt00 Dec 12 '15 at 21:51
  • As for your question, it might spend on context. But straight past tense probably works better most of the time. – shawnt00 Dec 12 '15 at 21:53
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In your examples:

...she called me...

is better than

..she had called me...

Had called leaves the reader wondering after what? did she call you.

I found myself wondering...

is less ambiguous than

I had found myself wondering...

which could also mean you were wondering before the conversation when, in fact, you only wondered after the conversation.

Slipped it out is incorrect, unless something was slipped out of somewhere:

She had a gun and slipped it out from under her garter.

whereas the meaning here is saying something unintentionally in which case let it slip should be used.

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