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I saw a whole lot of feet and shoes beginning to enter the room.

  1. Do this sentence mean a lot of feet and shoes not yet enter the room, and will enter the room or are ready to enter the room?

  2. Could this to-infinitive replace to gerund like a sentence below?

I saw a whole lot of feet and shoes beginning entering the room.

So, do this means a lot of feet and shoes are entering at the same time I saw them?

  • Weren't they human beings? In case they were, why not 'a lot of people entering the room'. Where did you read this? Source? – Maulik V Dec 15 '15 at 7:06
  • The subject in the sentence are a rat under a bed. hahaha – inches Dec 15 '15 at 7:36
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Do this sentence mean a lot of feet and shoes not yet enter the room,

Probably, and one might assume so, but the literal meaning of those words is that many feet were starting to enter.

and will enter the room or

One might assume so, but the sentence does not exactly say that they will. It just says I saw them starting to enter.

are ready to enter the room?

Yes, probably, but again it says that many are starting to do so.

It's an odd sentence. It's particularly odd without knowing the context, how the feet are mentioned as well as the shoes, as if they might be two different things and the shoes might be entering independently of the feet - perhaps the writer could only see bare(?) feet and shoes? However the literal meaning, as written, is that I saw many feet and shoes that at the moment I saw them, were just then starting to enter the room.

Could this to-infinitive replace to gerund like a sentence below?

I saw a whole lot of feet and shoes beginning entering the room.

Yes, but the double gerund is a very awkward way to say it. The infinitive "beginning to enter" is much better.

  • 1
    Thank you for answer. By the way, This is a rat under a bed who saw many feet and shoes. hahahah – inches Dec 15 '15 at 7:46
  • Sure. Hehe, then that makes sense. The first version of the sentence is good in that context. :-) – Dronz Dec 15 '15 at 7:56

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