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Win Win studies more seriously than Lynn Lynn. If I rewrite it as " Win Win does not study as slightly/lightly as Lynn Lynn," does it mean exactly the same as the original one? Thanks.

  • 'slightly' sounds odd. I don't think 'slightly' would qualify. – Varun Nair Dec 15 '15 at 10:40
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    Your title is incorrectly phrased. You've revised the sentence into a negative utterance, not a positive one. – M.A.R. Dec 15 '15 at 11:35
  • It is an exam question that was created for Grade 11 students. – yethu Dec 15 '15 at 12:03
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    What is exactly you want to do? Change your first sentence into a negative one? It's enough to put Win Win studies less seriously than Lynn Lynn. – Alejandro Dec 15 '15 at 12:29
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    "Slightly" and "lightly" are unlikely modifiers for "study". We don't normally say that a person "studies lightly". "Light" can be the antonym of "serious", but not in the sense that you are using "serious" here. Perhaps you mean "carelessly"? "Casually"? But I don't think there's really a clear opposite for "serious" as you're using it here, you really just need to say "not as seriously". – Jay Dec 15 '15 at 21:19
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AFAIK you have to introduce a negative when converting.

Max can run faster than John

will be converted to

John cannot run as fast as Max

So I'd say it's legal, but instead of 'lightly/slightly', use 'casually' or 'halfheartedly'.

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  1. Win Win studies more seriously than Lynn Lynn.

  2. Win Win doesn't study as lightly/slightly as Lynn Lynn.

Both sentencecs are different in meaning.

The former implies that both Win Winn and Lynn Lynn study seriously, but Win Win studies more seriously.

The latter indicates that both Win Win and Lynn Lynn study lightly/slightly, but Lynn Lynn studies more lightly/slightly.

However, the following sentence has the same meaning as the sentence #1.

Lynn Lynn doesn't study as seriously as Win Win.

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