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The morning we were going to the holiday, we had a bitter conversation. After that, the keys to the luggage ........... . Eventually, He found them in his jacket pocket.

1) got missed

2) went missing

3) went missed

4) got missing

The answer in the book is "went missing". I don't understand why "got missed" cannot be the correct answer. I tried with google search:

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Question:

Is there any grammarian point behind the correct option, "went missing", or it can be viewed as a collocation and verbal issue. I mean we should learn that things "go missing" not "get missing", "go missed", and "get missed".

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    "Got missed" is acceptable (informal?) English, but it doesn't mean something was misplaced. (For example, if I see a beer can along the side of the road after picking up some litter, I might say, "I tried to pick up all the cans, but it looks like one of them got missed.") – J.R. Dec 17 '15 at 10:47
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The word miss as a transitive verb also means "to notice or discover the absence or loss of" such as "When I got off the bus, I missed my watch" (The Free Dictionary).

In this sense, you can say "My watch wad missed" or "My watch got missed". Both the sentences are in the passive. They means that my watch was discovered missing. In formal writing or spoken English, we use " get" instead of "be" to form passives in the structure of get + past participle. For example, my watch got stolen = my watch was stolen.

On the other hand, we use "go" to mean become in the form of go + adjective. For example, he went mad.

In the sentence #2 presented by the OP, the word missing is an adjective. So it's correct grammatically if you say "The keys went missing". I think you can also use " get" in the sense of become i.e. the keys got missing.

So the sentences #2 and 4 are correct grammatically and mean the same thing, whereas the sentence #3 is not correct.

As for the sentence #1, it sounds to be correct, but it doesn't mean the same thing as the #2 and 4. Instead, it means that the keys were discovered missing.

  • By the way question, why went missed is ungrammatical, we say "go blind" , "go mad", and "go + adjective". Do you mean there is no such colocation – Cardinal Dec 17 '15 at 19:14
  • missed is a passive verb (past participle) that goes with get; it is not used with go. – Khan Dec 18 '15 at 3:04
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What the hell kind of book is it that says

The morning we were going to the holiday

??? Really? Throw it away.

Well, keys can go missing if their owner is humorous and all, but normal people would report it like this:

In the morning, prior to leaving on our holiday, we had a bitter fight. When we were done fighting, we discovered that the keys were missing. Eventually he found them in his jacket pocket.

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Is there any grammarian point behind the correct option, "went missing", or it can be viewed as a collocation and verbal issue. I mean we should learn that things "go missing"...

The grammar behind went missing is that it is the simple past tense is go missing. Other than that there is no grammar point at work. It is simply how we say it. You can call it a collocation if you wish.

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