2

Ok,

pull-up: an exercise in which you hold onto a high bar above your head and pull yourself up towards it Source

Ex: "I am doing pull-ups"

to pull up: (of a vehicle or its driver) to stop. Source

Ex: "He pulled up at the traffic lights".

so, the dictionary has no verb "to pull up" meaning "to do an exercise in which you hold onto a high bar above your head and pull yourself up towards it"

Without worrying about dictionary,

Can we just say "I am pulling up" instead of "I am doing pull-ups"?

  • 5
    In a word, no. As the dictionary says, it means something different. – StoneyB Dec 18 '15 at 11:36
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    Also, it would be "I am doing pull-ups" – Alex K Dec 18 '15 at 12:33
8

"To pull up" is taken to literally mean "to pull something else upwards", whereas "a pull-up" is a specific kind of exercise that someone performs. The big difference being that the concept of "doing" an exercise implies a repeated action, while simply "pulling up" implies doing it once.

So, for the same reason that you don't say "I am pushing up" instead of "I am doing push-ups", or "I am squatting" instead of "I am doing squats", you cannot say "I am pulling up" instead of "I am doing pull-ups".

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