2

see this structure:

different (from/to/than somebody/something): not the same as somebody/something; not like somebody/something else. Ex: "American English is significantly different from British English." Source

So, can we say:

American English is significantly different to British English.

or

American English is significantly different than British English.

They sound pretty weird to me.

0

1 Answer 1

2

American English is significantly different to British English.

The use of the preposition "to" after "different" is common in informal writing or spoken English in BE. It's not used in AE.

American English is significantly different than British English.

The use of "than" is chiefly used in AE; it's not common in BE.

American English is significantly different from British English.

The use of "from" is very common in both AE and BE.

1
  • Having a mother and two aunts who were teachers, they would all be spinning in their graves if I used anything other than "different from". We are/were all native BrE speakers and it grates that other (IMHO incorrect) usages have been accepted even by the BBC. Commented Mar 25, 2023 at 13:31

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .